Tuesday, May 31, 2016

Crafted Appliqué: New Possbilities Blog Hop (and a giveaway!)

Those of you who know me well are thinking "WTF? Has she lost her ever loving mind? Appliqué? Really?" But seriously, when my pal, Lara @ BuzzinBumble asked me to jump on the blog hop for her new book, Crafted Appliqué: New Possibilities, I couldn't say no.
Image of Crafted Appliqué: New Possibilities 
I am NOT an appliqué devotee. You know that. It gives me a unique perspective. I've sampled lots of different techniques: needle turn, fusible web, white glue, glue sticks, hand, machine, you name it. I don't want to give Lara's unique approach away, so I'm not giving you the full run down on it. I will say there is Modge Podge involved. Fear not. Lara researched and tested the living daylights out of this technique and breaks it down into excellent step by step instructions.
She compares a number of traditional methods and gives their pros and cons. She also gives sample pics of those techniques. It reminds me of America's Test Kitchen and their recipe tests! And those stray threads always drive me bonkers. Glad to know Lara's technique will mean the end of them for me!
And then there are the projects. I wish there were a few more small ones, like this charming needle book. Yup, all those sharp edges on the phone box are appliqué! But honestly, this book is more about the technique than anything else for me. It can be applied (see what I did there?) to any appliqué project you've fallen in love with and are too chicken to try for fear of messing it up.
Want your own copy? Well, you can pop on over to BuzzinBumble and order your own signed copy. Or you can leave me a comment below about the craziest notion you've ever used while quilting (and we're not limited to appliqué here) and take your chances with a giveaway. And don't forget to pop on over to the rest of the blogs on the hop!

This giveaway is open to international participants until 11:59 Atlantic Time on Sunday, June 5th. If you are a no-reply blogger, please leave an e-mail in your comment. If I can't reach you, you can't win! ☺

J

85 comments:

  1. I do not know whether this is crazy or not, but I use a rubber (eraser) to remove threads that got stuck in my cutting mat while cutting fabric with the rotary cutter.

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  2. I'm new to quilting so haven't used many notions as yet. The one that made my Mum laugh was my use of a pair of new, bright yellow, washing up gloves instead of quilting gloves! Thanks for the chance to win a copy of this book.
    annamariehlustik@googlemail.com

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  3. I tried using a basting gun once. The concept was fabulous - just lay out the sandwich and shoot little plastic ties to keep it all together. Unfortunately to get the gun to through all 3 layers you needed to push from the back of the sandwich. Which was impossible when it was stretched and taped to the floor. Very disappointing.

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  4. I've tried a lot of silly notions to get the perfect scant 1/4 inch seam. The worst one covered the bobbin plate so I could only use it until I needed to change the bobbin:) lauraluvsloonsatymaildotcom

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  5. Instead of tracing pattern pieces onto template plastic sheets I print the pieces onto normal printing paper, cut them out roughly and glue them to packaging card and then cut that out ready to draw around onto the fabric. Cereal packages are too flimsy for this, but the card used for supporting bed linen and men's shirts in their plastic bags is just the right thickness. The same plastic bags are handy for storing the cut pieces as well. It's win - win: recycled material, less plastic and MORE MONEY FOR FABRIC!

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  6. I'm always amazed at what wonderful gadgets my digits are! My fingers always know just what to do! And they are free! Also, I buy the plastic rolling sheets from The Dollar Store to cut my templates out of. I can cut a lot of templates from just one sheet and they hold up well. But, you can't iron on them. This looks like a great book. I've been following the hop here and there and it looks like it might like to live on my bookshelf! Thanks, Jenn! XO

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  7. I want to see what you made. I think my door peephole is the craziest notion, but one of the best ones in my sewing box.

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  8. looks like a very interesting and useful book

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  9. I'm new to applique so I don't have a base for something crazy. But the craziest thing I used for quilting was a tube that turned fabric so you would not have a seam. I know, I know, it does sound crazy, but I could never master the technique. Lara's book sounds so awesome, and I would love to learn applique. Thanks!

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  10. I haven't used anything too crazy! But my mom does think its crazy I use freezer paper for crafting and not, well for wrapping stuff in the freezer :)

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    1. A postcard! All these fancy tools and equipment we must have...but a postcard for folding back paper pieced blocks!

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  11. Lara's book has me thinking and wondering! I'm not an applique kind of gal...but I do see possibilities! Crazy gadget...anything in the kitchen is fair game!

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  12. not too crazy-- hair clips for binding instead of pins-- less expensive than wonder clips and work just as well

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  13. What's crazy is not replacing the bulb in your machine right away when it goes out! I had a little orange flashlight at my side for months just so I could thread my needle, lol!

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  14. Not so crazy, but I have an African porcupine quill that I use as a stiletto.

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  15. I haven't used anything crazy! Thanks for the giveaway!

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  16. Lara's book has my head spinning it's so cool! And I want to hear more about Anja's peep hole she's using as a notion :) I'm not sure I've used anything too crazy, but I have been known to shop in the automotive department and at building supply stores for quilting supplies.

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  17. Jenn, your feelings over the standard applique techniques are something a lot of us have, that's for sure. I do love needle-turn, but haven't got the patience needed for it. Thank you for your great review of my book! It cracked me up that it reminded you of "America's Test Kitchen". You should have seen some of the testing that went on - 0ne time I had 30 different permutations going in order to find the best way to do something!
    My daughter Kaitie designed and sewed the "It's Super Quilter" needle case and she was brand new to sewing when she made that. I'm so proud of her! I hope someday you'll be sewing with DT. :)

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  18. My crazy notion is Elmer's school glue. great for a temporary basting technique for sandwiching a quilt.

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  19. Don't know that this is crazy, but I have two bricks covered with a layer of batting and fabric I use as my extra set of hands in the studio. They hold backing down while I go to the other side and straighten it out and help hold down long lengths of newly washed and dried fabric when I get ready to press and fold it for storage. I use them for holding my cutting rulers in place too. Life in the studio would be more difficult without my bricks.

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  20. this looks like such a great book. I dont think I have done anything too crazy.
    quilting dash lady at comcast dot net

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  21. Well i made a figget lap blanket for neighbors mom who had alzheimer's...I had to think lol but it was fun to do.... happyness04431@yahoo.com

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  22. nothing too crazy, just your standard kitchen equipment bamboo skewers, muffin tin, and good old needle nose pliers. can't wait to try your technique

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  23. I use my knitting needles all the time for turning things inside out.

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  24. Anyone that knows me well thinks I'm a bit crazy. I'm always looking for ways to make jobs easier with items I have on hand. I use a decorative wine bottle holder to store my quilting rulers on the wall. It looks pretty and they are within reach. Now that wine...

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  25. I use dowel rods sharpened to a rounded small point for poking out corners, not too crazy.

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  26. I use chop sticks as pokers for turning things inside out!

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  27. Thanks for your review of this book. I'd love to learn Lara's tricks since applique is frustrating for me. With respect to odd notions - things from the dollar store (such as wooden skewers as edge turners and all of the hardware off cat and dog collars to use on bags - much cheaper than at the notions store!)

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  28. I was free motioning the giraffe quilt and it was backed with Minky. It wouldn't slide easily so I grabbed a pair of oven mits with silicone dots for my hands and that was better but then I cut a hole in the center of a new Teflon grill mat and taped that to my machine bed. Perfect! Necessity is the mother of invention or being too cheap to buy the already invented versions at the store.
    kthurn(at)bektel(dot)com https://tunaquilts.wordpress.com/

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  29. Well, after reading everyone else's comments, Quilt Pounce doesn't sound like a crazy notion at all, but that stuff sure is messy and will inhabit the bottom of my drawer for all time, I think!

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  30. Painters tape for marking lines to quilt by.

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  31. I use those "S" hooks from the hardware store to hang stuff off my wire rack. They are perfect for scissors, etc. I can't remember why I actually bought them.

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  32. I have used winter gloves with grippers to quilt with.

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  33. I have not been one to use any embellishments on my quilt projects, aside from applique. Yet, I have become a member of a guild for Project Linus and am loving creating quilts for kids. I decided on a quilt with applique that it needed more, so I played around with various ribbons and ric rac. The ric rac won and it was actually very fun to do. But that is my extension of embellishments so far.
    Thank you for the sharing your post and for the chance at winning one of these incredible books!

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  34. I use a hearing aid box to hold the sewing needle, threader, a couple bobbins, whatever small item I'm using on a particular handsewing project. This box snaps closed, and when open, it's lined with a rubbery type lining that bubbles out in the lid and is the perfectly secure place to stick my sewing needle. It does not come out until I'm ready to pull it out. No more losing track of where my needle fell to!!
    kakingsbury at verizon dot net

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  35. Not sure if the notions I have used are crazy or not. I use construction clamps to hold down my quilt sandwich when basting. I use industrial laser levels to square up my quilts. I have a headlamp for hiking that I wear when I need good light on a hand project, or cutting. It came in very hand when the power was off one time. Other than that, things are pretty standard--rotary cutters, rulers, pins, clover binding clips (LOOOOVE them), glue sticks of various types, etc.

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  36. I brought out a few decorative plates that I had tucked away in my china cabinet to use on my latest applique project. I love seeing them in my sewing room and they are so handy. I'm working on a little houses quilt and have lots of small pieces for doors, windows, chimney, etc. A small divided dish is perfect for these. I would like to know how Anja uses a peep hole in her sewing room - can't imagine! Thanks for the opportunity to win Lara's book.

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  37. I use Painters tape all the time. Love it for straight lines, holding down my Supreme Slider on my work station, and numerous other tasks...It sits in a basket by my machine!

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  38. Just last week I took my Janome Horizon to our quilt ministry so I could add the bindings on a couple donation quilts using the even feed foot, since none of the other gals have a machine with that type of foot. But I'd forgotten the little thread guide attachment needed when using the cone spool holders. Only thing I could find in my equipment tote was a tiny spring clothespin, so I threaded the thread through the metal spring and was able to clamp it to the side wall of one of the attachment holder cutouts in the top compartment of the machine, and it worked perfectly. Yes, I need a copy of this book!

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  39. This isn't too odd (I think), but I use mini binder clips to hold on quilt binding while sewing it.

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  40. hmmmmm not too sure about a crazy tool that hasn't already been used and declared as a quilting necessity. I do use lots of small dollar store plastic bins to sort cut fabric pieces for a project, since I am always hopping from one project to another before finishing. I do hope I win the book because I really need that new way of appliqueing that doesn't end up with frayed edges. Sounds like a most excellent new/crazy tool to me. :)

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  41. I use gardening gloves with the nibs on the tips for machine quilting.

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  42. This is a cute needlebook. I HAD to order my own copy of Lara's book; I'm so excited!

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  43. This probably isn't all that crazy, but I use bamboo skewers for lots of things,such as guiding fabric, turning things right side out, marking quilting lines,and hanging small projects. I'm sure there might be a use for Lara's technique, too.

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  44. I buy children's coloring books for ideas on applique....and I take photographs of sidewalks, floors, ceilings, brick walls, roofs, etc as ideas for quilting motifs....not really crazy...but as crazy as I get.

    Thanks for a chance to win.....( ooooh, I want this book so badly!!!!)

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  45. I use a short straw to hold larger spools of thread on my machine

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  46. I've been trying to convince people that a wooden wallpaper seam roller is NOT a crazy notion for quilting, but maybe it sounds that way. It works great for anything you would finger press, and even for pressing seams open. Also great instead of an iron when adding pieces during paper piecing.

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  47. I was helping my mom make a table runner for a gift and she did not have a quilting ruler so we used a yard stick - Maybe not so crazy but that all I can think of!

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  48. I'm a librarian so I use a bone (tool for mending books) to crease fabrics instead of finger pressing.

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  49. I think my craziest notions are the ones in my head...Like sure I can cut those blocks out with scissors freehand like they suggest you do in Improv Handbook for Modern quilters. I kept at it though and I got a finished quilt so what do you know.

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  50. Tupperware had this neat orange 'thingie' that helped you peel oranges. I have used it for peeling the seam allowance up after gluing it down to a EPP paper template. It sort of reminds me of the Purple Thang that I have seen but don't own. Great post and I'm super curious about the Mod Podge angle. I love mod podge....for a lot of OTHER projects but never quilting. 'quiltinmotion@gmail.com

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  51. Not unusual, but I use freezer paper a lot - full-size pattern templates, compass for drawing circles, paper-piecing, etc.

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  52. I use chopsticks to poke out the corners and a small paint roller for pressing seams down.

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  53. I use a drinking straw and an old lamp part to turn out really skinny tubes (like drawstrings)

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  54. Well, it was more like sewing than quilting, but I was making heavy duty tarpaulin like nylon- waterproof-fabric into a tent-like extension for our camping trailer, and had the Bernina EQ 440 set up on Hugh's workmate table, at low height, I had to sit on a cushion on the concrete floor, and way out on the left hand side, he held the huge width of this fabric as I fed it through the machine.But the notion that saved the day was to use double sided tape to hold the two fabrics together, as pins would not go through. I thanked the man who sold us the waterproof fabric so much for his tip. This would be the wackiest, weirdest and most helpful item ever to be used with my machine. And what a fab book, there have been so many wonderful projects sewn, every one a winner.

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  55. Was quilting using a large cone-shaped spool of thread and it was too big for the machine thread holder. Didn't have a free-standing thread stand and was afraid I'd knock a coffee cup off the table, so put the thread in a kid's sippy cup and pulled the thread out through the tiny hole in the lid. Worked great until I got a proper thread stand...actually sometimes better :).

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  56. Freezer paper but it's not really crazy...I would love to know this new method .

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  57. I use chopsticks to keep the thread and bobbin together on my sewing table. It can be very visually appealing when several spools are on the go at once and if I have spools of varying heights and widths. Thanks for your review of the book.

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  58. I'm trying to get my husband to buy me a laser light for cutting batting.
    sweetpeamarie2003@yahoo.com

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  59. I guess my craziest tool is chopsticks. I always have some in my sewing room for turning handles or pushing out edges. They do look a little odd in my sewing basket.

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  60. A hammer for flattening bulky seams. A gentle tap or two and they will lay down.

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  61. I like to use my tweezers for poking out those hard to reach corners, works great. grecomara at gmail dot com

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  62. I have a chopstick for turning points and I always keep a roll of scotch tape in my sewing bag. My favorite quilting notion is chocolate. I eat it to keep my energy up!

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  63. using a flashlight and magnet to pickup any pins or needles that may have fallen to the floor while sewing

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  64. Maybe not the craziest, but the dumbest was trying to satin stitch applique with not stabilizer.

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  65. Ideas, I have no original ideas! So I need some prodding, inspiration or something that helps me think of neat stuff.

    this book looks amazing! thanks for the giveaway.

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  66. I use a pair of artery forceps for turning through tight corners!

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  67. plastic chopstick, painter's tape, automotive clamp (looks like surgical forceps)... would like to try this new applique method. Thanks for the giveaway chance. refusestofear at yahoo dot com

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  68. I use wooden chopsticks all the time! What can I say? Use them for turning, poking out the corners and eating my sukiyaki/sushi/teriyaki chicken. p.s. I have a 'designated one' that I keep by my sewing machine.

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  69. I sometimes use a rubber jar opener to pull a needle through too many layers of fabric. I also use masking tape to make quilting lines. And I sometimes use one of those little eyebrow shavers to rip seams.

    Thanks for offering the giveaway.

    --Nancy. (ndmessier @ aol.com, joyforgrace.blogspot.com)

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  70. I've used a hemostat to remove the papers from hexies. Would love to win a copy of this book. Thanks. chocolatewiskers@aol.com

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  71. The craziest notion that I've ever used is a rolling pin for a seam roller ;)

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  72. Nothing too crazy but i'll use anything that comes to hand to push bulky layers through the machine - often a ruler. I also use ploers when hand stitching through too many layers

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  73. Haven't really used any "crazy" tools that I can recall. Do use pliers for pulling needles through the fabric when doing silk ribbon embroidery though.

    syvisser@gmail(dot)com

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  74. I don't think I've used anything crazy or unusual while quilting. I owned a quilt shop so have every tool at my fingertips. Thanks for the giveaway.

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  75. Lots of odd items (several are 'standard' quilting supplies these days): hemostat (stuffing applique), straws (turn applique items after adding non-woven fusible), blue painter's tape (oodles of things,e.g. marking 1/4" or quilting lines, freezer paper (applique, paper piecing), binder clips, parchment paper (fusible applique), small hair bands (for bobbins)and then there's the fishing takle box for buttons, bobbins, an other small items!

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  76. I've used eyebrow tweezers on occasion.

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  77. I don't really use crazy notions. Maybe sometimes is crazy not to use any at all ;) Thx!

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  78. The craziest notion I used was many years ago, during my handquilting days, a friend told me about a marking tool that her Dad, a welder, used. A long. rectangular piece of I don't what, that made a lovely white mark that washed out perfectly. I used it a lot and still have a piece.

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  79. I thought I was being crazy when I tried raw edge applique :) However, I am not so crazy about the edges..... Thank you for sharing!

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  80. I use a shower caddie to hold rulers and templates. I hang scissors on the hooks at the bottom. thanks for the giveaway

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  81. tweezers.. great for pulling stubborn thread

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  82. thanks for sharing ,i also find a good site for you to buy flashlight in good quality.and i got mine from here.
    www.gearbest.com/tiny-flashlight-_gear/

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